SGSquash speaks to LWW Part 2 : My journey coming back from multiple surgeries and why you shouldn’t rush your recovery.

Having been on the receiving end of injuries, it is no surprise why Low Wee Wern is particularly emphasising on physiotherapy facilities, as she shared about having them in the Kallang replacement centre in our first part of the LWW series. Hers was a painful story as she had to leave the tour at the peak of her career, then ranked fifth in the world, to undergo not one, but three major surgeries on her knee.

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SGSquash speaks to LWW Part 1 : My memories of Kallang Squash Centre and visions of a replacement centre.

One of the more familiar faces of world squash that has graced our shores regularly in recent years is Low Wee Wern. The 29-year old Malaysian has been seen on and off in Singapore running clinics, supporting events and of course, playing in tournaments. At her last competitive event here at the 2018 Singapore Open, she waltzed through to the title without dropping a single game.

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Au Yeong Wai Yhann puts squash up there with the outstanding student-athletes

A year after she bagged the Sports Achiever Award for her sporting prowess, Au Yeong Wai Yhann further added another feather to her cap when she was named the Moo Soon Chong Outstanding Student-Athlete for the year. An award aptly named in honour of the Singapore Sports School’s founding principal, it is awarded to the student of the highest order who has shown outstanding achievements in sports, studies and exemplary character.

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Sneha survives a tough 2019 and is now ready to concentrate on her squash again.

It was always going to be tough to follow up on her breakthrough quarter-final appearance at the World Junior Championships. What more with what she described as an “equally important thing in my life” – her education, and in this case, her A Level examinations. With that out of the way now, Sneha has been seen back in training diligently and in fact, she shares that she does two sessions each day.

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Consistency results over the year catapults Samuel into his career-high ranking.

A new role at work which would stop Samuel from training as often as he’d like to did not stop the Singapore number one from scaling to his new career-high ranking. With plenty of self-discipline, hard work and understanding from his employer, the Ministry of Education, Samuel was still able to train and compete at a considerably high level.

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